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Old 03-17-2013, 01:31 AM
Beastie Beastie is offline
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Hooking up my choke

I am trying to hook up my choke on my 73 f250. It's a stock 2 barrel on the stock 360. Based on what I've read on this forum I need to get a choke stove kit. Here are two links to the one I think I need. Is this the one?
http://1bad6t.com/Maverick/images/mav_0380.jpg

Dorman 55111 - SummitRacing.com

For the electric hookup, it sounds as if I need to connect it to the stator of the alternator. Is there a kit for this?
Here's a picture of my choke. Thanks!

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Old 03-17-2013, 02:37 AM
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Use any "switched" 12 volt source except the coil.
Just make sure it only has 12 volts in the ignition on position.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:34 AM
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This is the idea on how the choke stove was originally setup:

Click the image to open in full size.

A thermostatic "hot air" choke in conjunction with an electric assist is what Ford used on the stock Autolite and Motorcraft carburetors. The way it works is this:

Clean, filtered air from the air cleaner is pulled through the "fresh air" tube (a rubber hose that is connected to the carburetor air horn and attaches to an aluminum tube) and into the bottom of the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold, where the air is heated up when the engine is running. From there, the heated air goes back up through the insulated "hot air" tube (attached on the top of the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold) that connects to the choke cap. As the air gets hot, it closes the spring in the choke cap, which allows the choke plate to open up as the engine warms up to run on a leaner mixture.

The "electric assist" portion of the stock choke system does not work on its own like an aftermarket electric choke. In fact, it doesn't have to work at all in order for the hot air choke to be effective. It is only there to "assist" the hot air choke in temperatures above 60 degrees, where it helps the choke come off sooner for cleaner emissions. It doesn't work at all when the weather is colder than 60 degrees. It connects from the spade on the choke cap by a wire that connects to the back of the alternator. This part of the choke is secondary, meaning the choke will work fine without it, but the choke will not work without the thermostatic "hot air" choke system.

You should be able to find a universal Choke Stove Kit,(Dorman 03840) in the Help! section of most auto parts stores. This simple, cheap kit (about $20) is designed to bypass the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold and replace the stock choke tubes completely. The kit comes with a length of coiled up aluminum tubing that you can easily bend by hand, the tubing insulation, the hardware to mount the tube to the choke cap, and a little "dome" with a hole in one end for the tubing to push into. This dome clamps to the exhaust manifold or header pipe to trap the hot air when the engine is running and routes the hot air up to the choke cap:

Click the image to open in full size.

Here is a picture of the universal Choke Stove Kit on my own truck. It's a Ford 302 with an Autolite 4100 (without electric assist). The Autolite 2100/Motorcraft 2150 will hook up the same way:

Click the image to open in full size.

The factory setup had a "fresh air" tube that routed from the carburetor air horn down to the bottom of the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold. This location provided filtered air because this area is located on the "filtered air" side of the air filter once the air cleaner is in place. I drilled a second hole on the other end of the dome that came in the Choke Stove Kit so that the hot air going into the choke cap would be filtered, more like how it originally was set up in the first picture. You can see where mine attaches to the carburetor air horn by the rubber hose right behind the choke cap.

The universal Choke Stove Kit doesn't use the "fresh air" portion of the hot air choke at all.
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*302: 0.060 over, CompCams 31-230-3, "Thumper" E7 heads, Edelbrock Performer intake, Autolite 4100-4V, Duraspark II, Thorley Tri-Y headers, Flowmaster 40 true duals
*AOD transmission
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Old 03-26-2013, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redroad View Post
Use any "switched" 12 volt source except the coil.
Just make sure it only has 12 volts in the ignition on position.
Either one of those kits will work, they're both a universal style.
As for the electrical part. The stock choke does not use 12v for power.
You are correct, the choke's electrical connection gets connected to the "STA" terminal of the alternator. That terminal supplies 6-7 AC volts for power.
Originally, on the '73, the alternator wiring harness has a white w/ black trace wire that goes directly from the choke's coil to the "sta" terminal on the alternator. If that wire is gone or damaged, just run another wire.
Here is a picture of a NOS '73 alternator wiring harness. In the first picture the long white wire (actually white w/ black trace) that is taped goes to the choke housing. In the second picture the other end of the wire is hooked to the "sta" terminal of the alternator.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by LARIAT 85 View Post
Here is a picture of the universal Choke Stove Kit on my own truck. It's a Ford 302 with an Autolite 4100 (without electric assist).
Lariat 85, that sure is a nice, clean looking engine!
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeo0o0o0 View Post
Lariat 85, that sure is a nice, clean looking engine!
I was thinking the same thing, very nice!!
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Tees77f150 View Post
I was thinking the same thing, very nice!!
I like how he used the Motorcraft 4100 instead of Holley or Edelbrock .
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Old 03-26-2013, 02:43 PM
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Other hose from PCV Valve

Quote:
Originally Posted by LARIAT 85 View Post
This is the idea on how the choke stove was originally setup:

Click the image to open in full size.

A thermostatic "hot air" choke in conjunction with an electric assist is what Ford used on the stock Autolite and Motorcraft carburetors. The way it works is this:

Clean, filtered air from the air cleaner is pulled through the "fresh air" tube (a rubber hose that is connected to the carburetor air horn and attaches to an aluminum tube) and into the bottom of the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold, where the air is heated up when the engine is running. From there, the heated air goes back up through the insulated "hot air" tube (attached on the top of the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold) that connects to the choke cap. As the air gets hot, it closes the spring in the choke cap, which allows the choke plate to open up as the engine warms up to run on a leaner mixture.

The "electric assist" portion of the stock choke system does not work on its own like an aftermarket electric choke. In fact, it doesn't have to work at all in order for the hot air choke to be effective. It is only there to "assist" the hot air choke in temperatures above 60 degrees, where it helps the choke come off sooner for cleaner emissions. It doesn't work at all when the weather is colder than 60 degrees. It connects from the spade on the choke cap by a wire that connects to the back of the alternator. This part of the choke is secondary, meaning the choke will work fine without it, but the choke will not work without the thermostatic "hot air" choke system.

You should be able to find a universal Choke Stove Kit,(Dorman 03840) in the Help! section of most auto parts stores. This simple, cheap kit (about $20) is designed to bypass the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold and replace the stock choke tubes completely. The kit comes with a length of coiled up aluminum tubing that you can easily bend by hand, the tubing insulation, the hardware to mount the tube to the choke cap, and a little "dome" with a hole in one end for the tubing to push into. This dome clamps to the exhaust manifold or header pipe to trap the hot air when the engine is running and routes the hot air up to the choke cap:

Click the image to open in full size.

Here is a picture of the universal Choke Stove Kit on my own truck. It's a Ford 302 with an Autolite 4100 (without electric assist). The Autolite 2100/Motorcraft 2150 will hook up the same way:

Click the image to open in full size.

The factory setup had a "fresh air" tube that routed from the carburetor air horn down to the bottom of the choke stove chamber on the exhaust manifold. This location provided filtered air because this area is located on the "filtered air" side of the air filter once the air cleaner is in place. I drilled a second hole on the other end of the dome that came in the Choke Stove Kit so that the hot air going into the choke cap would be filtered, more like how it originally was set up in the first picture. You can see where mine attaches to the carburetor air horn by the rubber hose right behind the choke cap.

The universal Choke Stove Kit doesn't use the "fresh air" portion of the hot air choke at all.

Not meaning to Hijack per say, but I have always wondered where the secondary barb on that PCV Valve was meant to go, I see you have yours hooked up- Where do you have it going
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Old 03-29-2013, 10:07 PM
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Thank you for the compliments, gentlemen.

I decided on the Autolite 4100 because of the great driveability and reliability I received from my original Motorcraft 2150 carburetor my truck came stock with. When I converted to a 4-barrel, I originally used a Holley Avenger carburetor. It worked ok, but no matter how I tuned it, it never seemed to run as smooth as my original 2150. I later found out that Ford did offer a 4-barrel carburetor in the 1960s that was essentially a Motorcraft 2150 but with secondaries, and that was the Autolite 4100. That was all I needed to know. This carburetor is almost exactly like my original Motorcraft except for the secondaries in form and function. Even my stock fuel line from the fuel pump to the carburetor hooked right up with no modifications.

For street use and everyday driving, I found that the the Autolite 4100 (and Motorcraft 2150) are better carburetors than the Holley. The Autolite/Motorcraft thermostatic hot air choke works MUCH better than the electric choke found on any aftermarket carburetor, and Ford's annular boosters produce superior throttle response and economy over the Holley. And unlike the Holley, the Ford carburetor is a one-piece casting; it has no gaskets under the fuel level to leak. Best of all, my truck now starts up and runs every bit as good as ANY modern vehicle I have owned with fuel injection.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ford_pickup
I have always wondered where the secondary barb on that PCV Valve was meant to go, I see you have yours hooked up- Where do you have it going
That small hose that you see connected to the top nipple of the PCV valve connects to the canister purge valve on the charcoal canister down by the battery. It's part of the evaporative (EVAP) emissions system. That particular hose connects to the top port of the canister purge valve, which provides the "purging" of trapped fuel vapors (from the gas tank and carburetor, which are also connected to the canister purge valve by hoses) from the charcoal canister to the PCV valve for burning in the intake manifold. It does the same thing that the bottom PCV valve hose does except that hose pulls vapors from the crankcase and into the intake manifold for burning.
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1985 Ford F150 XLT Lariat
*302: 0.060 over, CompCams 31-230-3, "Thumper" E7 heads, Edelbrock Performer intake, Autolite 4100-4V, Duraspark II, Thorley Tri-Y headers, Flowmaster 40 true duals
*AOD transmission
*2wd, 3.55 gears
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Old 03-29-2013, 10:07 PM
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